Diamond Education

The factors that determine the final value of a diamond include the cut, color, clarity and carat weight – these are referred to as the 4Cs and are fundamentals of gemstone shopping. Each of these factors are highlighted and defined below:

Cut

A diamond’s cut enhances the shine and beauty ofthe stone and makes it look brilliant and fiery. Cutting adds to the value ofthe diamond; while flaws in cutting can render a stone less valuable. Cuttingcan enhance the look and feel of the diamond and even make it appear largerthan it is; a diamond in the skilled hands of an expert cutter will become allit can be. Diamonds that are cut will have several different properties:

Scintillation: The colors that are reflected when the diamond is moved Brilliance: The light that reflects from a diamond’s surface Dispersion: The ability of the stone to reflect color and light

All these factors combine to highlight thebeauty of a properly cut stone.

Clarity

How clear is the diamond, and are there anyvisible flaws? You should not be able to see any inclusions when you view thestone with your naked eye. Clarity impacts the beauty of your diamond andshould be balanced with other factors to get the best possible stone.

Carat

The weight and size of the diamond is expressedin Carats; this measurement impacts the overall cost and value of your stone.The carat of your diamond will depend on your budget and your preferences andwill impact the cost of the final piece.

Color

Stones with the least amount of visible colorare generally considered the most valuable; the color of a diamond can rangefrom truly colorless to faintly colored. Color is rated by letter; withcolorless stones in the D-F range considered the most valuable. Other colorsrank as follows:

Colorless: D-F stones how no color and are the most valuable diamonds; a skilled gemologist can detect some color in an F grade stone in the right conditions. Near colorless: G-J stones don’t show color from the face but may show color from the back or sides. Most people can’t detect color at all in these stones. Faint Color: K stones have hints of color when viewed face up and may even delight owners who like a bit of color. Yellows to browns are the predominant colors in this category.


Diamond Care

Diamond Cleaning - The Do's and Don'ts

Bridal jewelry, such as engagement rings andwedding bands are typically worn daily, and can appear like they've lost theirsparkle if not cleaned on a regular basis. Lotions put film on diamonds andreduce their shininess. Don't wear diamond jewelry while doing rough work.Avoid chlorinated pools and hot tubs. Avoid touching diamonds with yourfingers, as smudges can affect a diamond's luster and fire.

Expert Service

If you have questions, feel free to contact oneof our diamond experts at Rick Murphey The Jeweler, and we will be happy toprovide all the information you need to help you keep your diamonds in greatshape.


Jewelry Care

Storing your Jewelry

Because of the high value and rarity of certainjewelry, some people like to store their jewelry in a safe when not in use. Ifyou have individual gemstones, a soft pouch is good for keeping them fromcoming in contact with other hard surfaces. Store silver jewelry in a cool, dryplace, preferably in a soft piece of felt or cloth. Ask one of our salesrepresentatives about getting a jewelry box for all your valued treasures. Ifyou would like to have your jewelry professionally cleaned, bring it in to RickMurphey The Jeweler and we will have your jewelry looking shiny and new!

Cleaning Your Jewelry

Be careful using ultrasonic cleaners, as onlycertain gemstones can handle the ultrasonic vibrations. Diamond cleanersusually contain ammonia and water. Using a soft brush you can remove dust ordirt from under the setting. Silver jewelry can be cleaned with a silverpolishing cloth, with or without special silver cleaning solution.


Anniversary Guide

Our Anniversary Guide can help you find that perfect piece of jewelry for your loved one.

Need Ideas for an Anniversary Gift?

Our list contains both traditional and modern gifts for each year of your anniversary. But it doesn't always have to be a special occasion to give the gift of jewelry. Not sure what to get? Ask our staff at Rick Murphey the Jeweler for some great gift ideas! Contact us today.

Year Jewelry Gift Traditional Gift Modern Gift
1st Gold Paper Clocks
2nd Garnett Cotton China
3rd Pearls Leather Crystal or Glass
4th Blue Topaz Fruit or Flowers Appliances
5th Sapphire Wood Silverware
6th Amethyst Candy or Iron Wood
7th Gold Paper Clocks
8th Gold Paper Clocks
9th Gold Paper Clocks
10th Gold Paper Clocks
11th Gold Paper Clocks
12th Gold Paper Clocks
13th Gold Paper Clocks
14th Gold Paper Clocks
15th Gold Paper Clocks
16th Gold Paper Clocks
17th Gold Paper Clocks
18th Gold Paper Clocks
19th Gold Paper Clocks
20th Gold Paper Clocks
21st Gold Paper Clocks
22nd Gold Paper Clocks
23rd Gold Paper Clocks
24th Gold Paper Clocks
25th Gold Paper Clocks
26th Gold Paper Clocks
27th Gold Paper Clocks
28th Gold Paper Clocks
29th Gold Paper Clocks
30th Gold Paper Clocks
31st Gold Paper Clocks
32nd Gold Paper Clocks
33rd Gold Paper Clocks
34th Gold Paper Clocks
35th Gold Paper Clocks
36th Gold Paper Clocks
37th Gold Paper Clocks
38th Gold Paper Clocks
39th Gold Paper Clocks
40th Gold Paper Clocks
41st Gold Paper Clocks
42nd Gold Paper Clocks
43rd Gold Paper Clocks
44th Gold Paper Clocks
45th Gold Paper Clocks
46th Gold Paper Clocks
47th Gold Paper Clocks
48th Gold Paper Clocks
49th Gold Paper Clocks
50th Gold Paper Clocks
51st Gold Paper Clocks
52nd Gold Paper Clocks
53rd Gold Paper Clocks
54th Gold Paper Clocks
55th Gold Paper Clocks
56th Gold Paper Clocks
57th Gold Paper Clocks
58th Gold Paper Clocks
59th Gold Paper Clocks
60th Gold Paper Clocks
61st Gold Paper Clocks
62nd Gold Paper Clocks
63rd Gold Paper Clocks
64th Gold Paper Clocks
65th Gold Paper Clocks
66th Gold Paper Clocks
67th Gold Paper Clocks
68th Gold Paper Clocks
69th Gold Paper Clocks
70th Gold Paper Clocks
71st Gold Paper Clocks
72nd Gold Paper Clocks
73rd Gold Paper Clocks
74th Gold Paper Clocks
75th Gold Paper Clocks
76th Gold Paper Clocks
77th Gold Paper Clocks
78th Gold Paper Clocks
79th Gold Paper Clocks
80th Gold Paper Clocks

Jewelry Glossary

Below are definitions to some common jewelry terms. If there is a word that is not on this list, and you would like to learn its definition, please contact us.

Alloy

The mixture of two or more metals which strengthens the metal, and/or enhances its appearance.

Bangle

A bracelet that is rigid and slides over the hand. Bangle bracelets sometimes don't have a clasp.

Bead Setting

Diamonds or color gemstones are set evenly with the surface of the metal, and secured by bead-like prongs between the stones.

Bezel Setting

A diamond or gemstone is wrapped with the metal, where only the crown and table can be seen.

Blemish

An imperfection on the surface of a diamond.

Brilliance

The amount of sparkle or shine which is reflected from the diamond.

Cabochon

A gemstone cut which is polished into a smooth, rounded dome-like surface, instead of having facets.

Carat Weight

A diamond's measurement for weight, which is equal to 0.2 grams, as described in the four Cs of diamonds.

Cathedral Setting

A setting that has cathedral-like arches on each side of the diamond or gemstone.

Channel Setting

Diamonds or color gemstones are arranged adjacent to one another in a channel, with no metal between each stone.

Clasp

A device which is used to fasten the end of chains, necklaces, bracelets and watches.

Cleavage

Cracks, openings, or fractures in diamonds or color gemstones.

Cluster Setting

Diamonds or color gemstones are grouped together, which can be arranged to look like one large stone.

Crown

The upper part of a diamond or gemstone, beneath the table and above the girdle.

Culet

The small facet on the bottom point of a diamond, beneath the pavilion. Not all diamonds have a culet.

Facet

The flat surface on a diamond or color gemstones. The arrangement of a gemstone's facets determine its cut and return of light.

Fire

The flashes of color that can be seen when a diamond or gemstone is moved or rotated.

Flawless

The highest grading on the diamond clarity scale, which has no visible inclusions or blemishes under 10x magnification.

Flush Setting

A hole is created in the metal surface, and a diamond or gemstone is placed inside, where its table is evenly set with the surface of the metal.

Four Cs

The four characteristics of a diamond - color, clarity, cut and carat weight - which are used to establish the quality and value of diamonds.

Girdle

The middle section of a diamond or gemstone, which can be polished or faceted on a diamond, and typically unpolished on color gemstones.

Hardness

The ability of a diamond or gemstone to resist scratches, which is measured using the Moh's scale of hardness from 1-10, with 10 being the hardest.

Ideal Cut

An ideal cut diamond has the highest quality of proportions, symmetry and polish, and returns the maximum amount of light from the top of the diamond.

Inclusions

The natural unique \"fingerprints\" within a diamond or gemstone, which consist of other elements such as minerals, gases, or other substances.

Inlaid Setting

Diamonds or color gemstones are set flush within the surface of the metal, where a part of the metal setting is cut away and replaced by the stone.

Invisible Setting

A diamond or gemstone is set in an arrangement where the metal cannot be seen, making it appear as there is no setting behind the stone.

Karat

The standard measurement for gold, where 24 karats is pure gold. 14-karat or 18-karat gold is mixed with other metal alloys to strengthen it, and to enhance its appearance.

Moh's Scale

The scale which is used to measure the hardness of a diamond or gemstone, or its resistance to scratches, ranging from 1-10, with 10 being the hardest.

Pavé Setting

Small diamonds or color gemstones are held in place by small handcrafted prongs, where all the tables of the stones are set evenly with the metal surface.

Pavilion

The bottom portion of a diamond, between the girdle and the culet.

Pink Gold

Pink gold is created when pure gold is combined with more copper than other alloys, and is sometimes called rose gold.

Polish

The amount of smoothness, or shininess on a metal's surface. The more polished, the more light reflects off a metal's surface.

Play of Color

The spectral colors that can be seen in an opal when it is rotated or moved.

Prong Setting

A diamond or gemstone is mounted to the metal with prongs that wrap around its girdle, and are usually secured to the crown of the stone.

Proportions

The relationship of a diamond's parts to one another, such as crown angle, crown height and table percentage, which ultimately determine a stone's brilliance.

Scintillation

The flashes of light that can be seen in a diamond when rotated under a natural or artificial light source.

Solitaire

Rings, pendants, earrings, bracelets, or necklaces that feature one diamond in its setting.

Symmetry

The precision of the alignment of a diamond's facets. The more symmetrical, the better the return of light.

Table

The flat surface on the top of a diamond or gemstone.

Tension Setting

A diamond or gemstone is suspended inside the metal setting, where most of the diamond is exposed.

Toughness

The ability for a diamond or gemstone to resist breakage (or fracturing) from impact.

White Gold

Made by combining pure gold with copper, zinc and nickel (or palladium) alloy, such as rhodium.

Yellow Gold

Gold that retains its natural yellow color. Pure gold is typically combined with copper and silver alloys to enhance its durability.